World Cup - RIP England - the English papers' reaction

What the English press thought of The Three Lions' final World Cup 2014 match, a goalless draw with Costa Rica.

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World Cup - RIP England - the English papers' reaction
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Phil Jones, Steven Gerrard and Wayne Rooney of England (Reuters)

John Dillon in the Daily Express: The future of English football went on display here last night and at last, it found its dismal, broken, feeble, hopeless flaccid and utterly meaningless place at the World Cup. As a back-drop for Mexican waves, gurning selfie shots of the utterly disinterested crowd on the stadium big screen and distracted games of bounce the beach-ball around the stand, nobody does it better than England. The other stuff, the game, can be left to everyone else, in the knowledge that in the homeland where it was born, they have run out of players - young as well as old - enthusiasm, ideas, scapegoats and interest. In its international brand, anyway.

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[MATCH REPORT: ENGLAND BOW OUT WITH DRAW]

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Oliver Holt in the Daily Mirror: The hope was that today might provide more evidence of the young talent that might make England contenders at Euro 2016 in France. It didn’t. Sorry to sound resigned again but it was never really that kind of game. It was a dead rubber that played out exactly like a dead rubber. The most worrying aspect of it were the performances of Phil Jones and Chris Smalling in defence. If they are the future, then on this display we are not going to be contending for anything for a long time. They were both dire.

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[HODGSON HAPPY WITH IMPROVED ENGLAND]

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Steven Howard in the Sun: Premier League chairmen must be told of the short-sighted folly of buying cheap imports — how it ruins the game and the prospects of the rapidly decreasing number of young English players within it. Richard Scudamore must be brought to account every time he blows his trumpet about just how brilliant the Premier League is. The FA must show some cojones by actually standing up to the league juggernaut. And, most important of all, the wind of change blowing up at St George’s Park must start producing the coaches our national game so badly needs. You don’t have to look at the top of the Premier league to know there is a desperate lack of English coaching talent. You just have to look at the way England played yesterday.

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Jason Burt in the Daily Telegraph: Again as many questions as answers for England in a World Cup campaign which has come too late for some of the older players and too early for the young ones. Nine changes were made by Roy Hodgson against Costa Rica with Ross Barkley, Jack Wilshere and Luke Shaw drawn into his line-up but it petered out into a mish-mash in their final Group D match. Why did Frank Lampard start when he is 36 and probably at the end of his international career? Why did Hodgson end the game with Steven Gerrard replacing Wilshere, who had come into his own, and therefore create a central midfield with a combined age of 70 and little future worth?

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Barney Ronay in the Guardian: Well, then. That really is that. In Belo Horizonte England left the World Cup for the second time in a week – like the Queen and her birthdays they have been granted both a ceremonial exit and a de facto one – after drawing 0-0 with Costa Rica, who finished top of group D. If this was a wonderful day for Costa Rican football, it was a meek, deathly and oddly familiar one for England, a match that felt less like an actual tournament encounter than a necessary act of footballing euthanasia.

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Jeremy Cross in the Daily Star: Belo Horizonte translates as 'beautiful view' here in Brazil - but the scene from the English dugout painted a grim picture. Vincent Van Gogh is wasn't. In fact, for long spells it was more akin to something my eight year-old daughter would produce with her crayons back home. In other words, a scrambled mess with no subject or pattern to it. This was a glimpse into the future but it seemed as depressing as the past, so Hodgson and the FA should be very alarmed by what they saw. One of the few England banners spotted inside the Estadio Mineirao said: 'In Roy We Trust' but such faith can now be viewed as either blind or downright stupid. That's because Hodgson will have the job of his life on when it comes to putting together a team capable of winning Euro 2016 in France.

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[SEVEN TRUTHS: A GOOD DAY TO BURY BAD NEWS]

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Tony Cascarino in the Times: For the past two decades, England have been living an illusion, lurching from one tournament to the next nurturing the fantasy that everything will somehow be all right. It was an illusion that stretched into their first match in Brazil, but that defeat against Italy does not feel quite so upbeat now that their victors are also going home and Roy Hodgson’s team have finished bottom of a mediocre group. The most basic reason for that is not, in my opinion, the lack of opportunities for young English players in the Barclays Premier League, an influx of foreigners or even the style of football played by under-fives. It is because there is an underestimation of the importance of the manager at this level.

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Neil Ashton in the Daily Mail: We came to Brazil with dreams of making our mark. Instead England arrive home after the worst World Cup showing in the history of the national team. Their credibility as a footballing power is shot to pieces after defeats by Italy and Uruguay and a lifeless 0-0 draw with Costa Rica. At the centre of the farce is manager Roy Hodgson, still in his job despite his failure and bizarrely claiming that England hadn’t been outplayed or outclassed.

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