World Cup - Paper Round: Angry Roy Keane 'blasts' Hodgson

A seemingly furious Roy Keane has blasted his namesake Hodgson; while a World Cup star has admitted to cheating; and reaction from the day three of the World Cup - the main stories making headlines in this morning's newspapers.

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Premier League - Angry Roy Keane 'rang player's doorbell for 15 minutes'
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Roy Keane.

Keane blasts Hodgson’s use of sports psychologist: Roy Keane has blasted Roy Hodgson’s use of sports psychologist Steve Peters in what is reported as an angry rant by the Daily Mirror. His issue seems to be that in his opinion it is the manager’s job to mentally prepare his players and, as such, Peters should keep a low profile. "The sports psychologist should be the manager,” said Keane. "Brian Clough was the best sports psychologist for me and Alex Ferguson was good. I heard Peters speak at Wembley two years ago and we should be open-minded and not knock it." Keane is very frustrated with the way the game is going with managers taking a back seat on the mental side of preparation and man-management. It was not like this in his day, certainly not under the management of Clough or Ferguson.

Paper Round’s view: It is certainly not difficult to portray Keane as angry and, given the manner in which he delivers his opinions, it very likely was a pretty furious outburst. However, despite the fact that Keane was reportedly angry and blasting Hodgson over his delegating of mentally preparing players, his comments do actually make a lot of sense as many fans see the situation. While Peters should be used to assist the England team, ultimately it is Hodgson who is responsible for the team’s preparation and it should be his duty to ensure that the mentality and attitude of the players is right. Does it undermine his management to delegate such matters? It's very difficult to say, but being of the old school it is little surprise to see how passionate Keane is on the subject. The buck has to stop with the manager.

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Chile’s Jara admits to cheating: Chile’s Gonzalo Jara has admitted to cheating at the World Cup, according to the Guardian. The revelation comes from Australia’s Tim Cahill, who claims that he had called Jara a cheat after a coming together that saw Cahill receive a yellow card. Cahill claims that the Nottingham Forest star shrugged and said “yes, I'm a cheat, so what”.

Paper Round’s view: This is the archetypal none story. Behaviour such as this is commonplace throughout the game nowadays. Most players will do anything they can to secure an advantage, so, while Jara’s brazen attitude may shock some, his frankness is commendable. People cheat, it is a fact of life.

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And this is how the nation's papers reacted to the third day of the 2014 World Cup – with England’s loss against Italy dominating.

Barney Ronay in the Guardian: Be bold, Roy, be bold. And so he was. England may have been punished in both halves by a measured and incisive Italian side in Manaus but this still felt like a moment to applaud both Roy Hodgson and his team. Despite Italy’s own excellence in taking two well-crafted chances, one thing at least seem certain after this. England do have an in-form tournament class No10 in this squad. And it turns out he isn’t called Wayne.

Chosen in his best position behind the central striker, Raheem Sterling gave a fine, nimble-footed display in the first hour and beyond, not just of driving speed and quick-footed dribbling but of measured passing and vision with and without the ball. Indeed for long periods, in contrast to the retreat from Kiev two years ago, this match shaped up as a mini-battle within a battle between England’s No10 and Italy’s grand old uber-bearded regista Andrea Pirlo, with Sterling often willing to occupy the same space as Italy’s conductor, and driving on a spirited game-chasing England performance.

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Paul Hayward in the Telegraph: The message to Wayne Rooney could have been no clearer. Neymar, Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben had shown England’s senior striker what needs to be done at World Cups. The great players are not visitors to the grandest stage. They write their names across the sky.

Rooney’s response? A quiet first half hour of confusion about whether to help his left-back, Leighton Baines, deal with a wave of Italian attacks or join the creative department further up the pitch. Just as the dump-Rooney society were starting to rev up, Raheem Sterling struck a sweet pass for England’s senior striker to deliver the perfect left-foot cross into the path of Daniel Sturridge to equalise. But a painfully missed chance in the second half and another wild shot over the bar raised further doubts about his place in this England team.

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Martin Samuel in the Daily Mail: For England, this was a strange kind of World Cup defeat. This time will be few recriminations, no grand inquest, little soul-searching, no official or lay examination of what is rotten in our game. England played well, but lost. Went for it, but lost. Had many of the best chances, but lost. That happens in football and we’ll live with it. Frankly, we’ll have to. England were beaten by Italy not because Roy Hodgson was too cautious or the forwards inferior. They lost because Italy were better, just.

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Sam Wallace in the Independent: The England of 2014, led by the teenager Raheem Sterling and at last playing like a team that knows how to attack, have finally arrived on the world stage. A pity for them that they should come up against those shrewd old men of Italy, who picked them off in the second half and condemned Roy Hodgson’s men to the kind of cruel defeat that can befall good teams.

A first-match World Cup finals defeat for England. The result that no one wanted albeit the performance that everyone had prayed for. Yes, at times England wobbled in defence, and Mario Balotelli’s winner on 50 minutes was the kind of goal that no team should concede but that was always a possibility. Yet Hodgson’s team showed an attacking threat that gives hope.

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