Football - Paper Round: 'Disgrace of Disgraces'

Brazilian newspapers and websites were unanimous that the national team's 7-1 hammering by Germany in the World Cup semi-final was the greatest shame in the country's illustrious footballing history.

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Football - Paper Round: 'Disgrace of Disgraces'
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Brazil's goalkeeper Julio Cesar concedes another against Germany in Belo Horizonte (AFP)

"Historic Disgrace" read the massive headline on the website of the Folha de S.Paulo, Brazil's most influential newspaper.

Brazil is the only country to win the World Cup five times but the paper pointed out this was not just their biggest loss but the heaviest suffered by a host nation at the finals.

"Brazilian football was reduced to dust," said main sports columnist Juca Kfouri, adding that Brazil was now one of two nations to have hosted and lost the World Cup twice.

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The globoesporte website, part of the Globo media empire, called the result the 'Disgrace of Disgraces', in an ironic reference to President Dilma Rousseff's repeated claims - and tweets - that this would be the World Cup of all World Cups.

The hashtag they chose instead was #ICan'tBelieveit.

O Globo, the flagship paper of the Rio empire, preferred to lead with the words of Scolari, who told reporters that he accepted the blame for the result.

"I'm responsible for all this," was the paper's headline.

[WORST DAY OF MY LIFE, SAYS SCOLARI]

Here's how the British press reported the stunning result in Belo Horizonte.

Oliver Holt in the Daily Mail: They had been worried about muggings during this World Cup and they got one. A big one. It wasn’t a handbag that was pinched here at the Estadio Mineirao. Or a wallet. Or a mobile phone. Germany thought an awful lot bigger than that. They went the whole hog and stole Brazil’s football identity.

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Paul Hayward in the Daily Telegraph: Brazil spent $11 billion on a national calamity. The world’s greatest football nation was left numb, humiliated and flummoxed as five German goals flew into their net in the first 29 minutes of a crushing 7-1 defeat. Neymar was not the only one missing in action. It was true of Brazil’s whole defence, discipline and structure. A majestic display of German passing through the centre of this Belo Horizonte pitch will be obscured by the trauma endured by Brazil.

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Dominic Fifield in the Guardian: The tears were already flowing in the stands even as Sami Khedira wheeled away to celebrate the Germans’ fourth goal in seven minutes. Julio Cesar, helpless amid the chaos, screamed at the ragged ranks of team-mates as they sank to their knees around the penalty area, clutter around which their opponents danced, but they wore the haunted looks of those who were not taking anything in. Luiz Felipe Scolari propped himself on the edge of the dugout, his shoulders hunched and all conviction drained. This was an utter humiliation, a rout that defied belief. The present day Selecao have endured their own Maracanazo.

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Neil Ashton in the Daily Mail: The vanishing foam being used to make sure defensive walls retreat a full ten yards at the World Cup will come in handy over the next few days. No-one in this country of 200m football obsessives will ever want to see this Brazil team ever again after they lost this World Cup semi-final 7-1. They should be scrubbed out, wiped from the history of the game after they were picked off by Joachim Loew’s rampant Germany team. What a vanishing act this was, with Julio Cesar, Maicon, captain David Luiz, Dante and Marcelo turning in one for the worst performances at the highest level in living memory.

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Steven Howard in the Sun: For Brazilians, O Jogo Bonito had been buried alive under an awesome, crushing, unanswerable juggernaut. Instead, the Beautiful Game is being played by Joachim Low’s Germans. Truly, it was just like watching Brazil — the one of the Fifties, Sixties and Seventies. Many of them, Pele included, were in the stands at Belo Horizonte yesterday to see this national disaster unfold. In a result even more staggering than Holland’s 5-1 destruction of defending champions Spain, the once-mighty five-time World Cup winners were toyed with by their opponents. Even for neutrals it was like a knife to the bone.

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Joe Callaghan in the Independent: They’re a peculiar thing, golden generations, available in just about every shade. None of us is sure if England’s has now passed. Some of us remain doubtful if it ever got here in the first place. For Germany, a country with three World Cup wins and three European Championships to match, how a group who have come up short for over a decade now are cast in gold, we’re also not quite sure.

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Matt Dickinson in the Times: The ultimate humiliation was saved for last when the Brazil players gathered in the middle of the pitch and tried to applaud those supporters who had not already fled the embarrassment. As the jeers rolled off the terraces, the humbled members of the Selecao were forced to abandon the gesture, many sobbing as they fled down the tunnel. It can only be wondered how long it will take them, and Brazilian football, to recover from torment on such a scale.

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Paul Joyce in the Daily Express: This was utter humiliation. This was sheer embarrassment. It was a modern-day Mineiraozo. Brazil has spent 64 years trying to forget the harrowing moment they lost the final of the World Cup on home soil, forever christened the Maracanazo, and now they have a fresh football disaster to try to blot from their consciences. This time there is not even the consolation of having made it that far.

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