Football - Agdestein impressed with Hughes

Inverness striker Torbjorn Agdestein has praised new manager John Hughes for resisting the temptation to make wholesale alterations to the side.

Hughes collected his first win in his second game in charge since succeeding Terry Butcher after a Billy McKay brace sealed the spoils with a 2-0 win at Hearts on Saturday.

Norwegian marksman Agdestein insists the former Hibs and Falkirk manager has been true to his work in changing very little to the team that was guided into second place in the Premiership by Butcher.

Hughes enjoyed a full week on the training pitch ahead of the trip to Tynecastle after being appointed just three days before last week's goal-less draw at St Mirren.

And Agdestein admits Hughes' arrival has been seamless, with the former Brighton player saying: "Everything has basically been the same, he is a great character.

"He has shown he wants the club to do as well as it has done. He does not want to change much with things going so well as they have been. Training has been basically the same.

"Maybe a few training drills and things like that are a bit different but that's about it.

"He knows that there is nothing he really needs to change because of how well we've done. You don't want to change a winning team, as he hasn't done."

Hughes is regarded as one of Scottish football's larger-than-life characters, while Butcher was colourful in his own right.

Agdestein added: "The new gaffer has settled in very well, he's quite a funny guy. He tries to make it fun on the training ground, as well as serious.

"I've not seen a bad side to him yet."

After a tight first half, Northern Ireland internation McKay broke the deadlock in the 59th minute with a cool finish from inside the box after edging past Jamie Hamill.

He sealed the win in the 83rd minute by grabbing his 15th of the season with a clinical drive from 18-yards that found the top corner.

"We lifted it in the second half, we started off a bit slow but we did the basics very well, we worked very hard like we used to do," Agdestein said.