Cricket - Broad believes in England bosses

Stuart Broad is confident all the right men are in charge to help him make an instant success of England's post-Kevin Pietersen era.

Broad's exacting brief, as captain of a young squad initially in the West Indies for the next three weeks and then to travel on to the ICC World Twenty20 in Bangladesh, is to put England's miserable Ashes winter well and truly behind them.

It will be no easy task, of course, to achieve the requisite level of success in Antigua, Barbados and then Chittagong to ease the pain of that 5-0 Ashes whitewash and its dramatic aftermath.

But with the leadership help of limited-overs coach Ashley Giles and his new assistant Paul Collingwood - captain for England's only triumph in a global tournament, coincidentally in the Caribbean, in 2010 - Broad believes his team can progress quickly.

Giles, along with Broad himself, was part of the one-day international and Twenty20 hammerings at the hands of Australia which followed the Ashes debacle.

Giles has already made it clear he will be demanding a strong work ethic, while his fello former Ashes-winner Collingwood has spoken of putting the fun back into playing for England.

Broad said: "Within this side, we're very clear of the direction we want to go.

"It's a really exciting group.

"Gilo described these first three weeks as a bit of a 'boot camp' - the chance to work hard on our skills."

Batting expert Graham Thorpe, another ex-Test team-mate of Giles and Collingwood, will also be part of the coaching team.

Broad has great faith in all three.

"He's a fantastic guy to have around, a bubbly character," the captain said of Collingwood, under whom he helped to win that World Twenty20.

"He always thinks outside the box, which is important, and he brings experience of winning a World Cup.

"He had some success coaching Scotland in New Zealand (this winter), so that will benefit us too.

"It gives guys belief that they can actually win it."

If Giles is to be named Andy Flower's successor before the start of the new summer, England must perform for him in the Caribbean and then on the sub-continent.

But Broad said: "I don't think Gilo will see this as an audition, because he knew he was going on this two years ago.

"He has good qualities - he's calm, and a good man-manager.

"He seems to control the dressing room, and that's important."

Broad's own influence will be most telling of all, of course, as England seek to re-establish a winning equilibrium following Flower's resignation as team director and - most controversially of all - the axing from all future plans of record runscorer Pietersen.

"It will be the longest period of time I've been in charge, and that's exciting for me," he added.

"Normally (in Twenty20 series) you get three hours on a Thursday, play on a Friday and see each other again in three months.

"It's great to have that opportunity, but we know... we've got to move our skills forward to really challenge in Bangladesh."