The Rundown

Nalbandian joins tennis Hall of Shame

David Nalbandian is in hot water for his behaviour during the Queen's Club final at the weekend - but he's not the first, and he's unlikely to be the last, tennis player whose behaviour falls well short of what is expected.

Nonetheless, it is only fitting to 'induct' the Argentine into our entirely unofficial Tennis Hall of Shame...

David Nalbandian

The year: 2012

The crime: Kicking an advertising hoarding during the Queen's Club final — which then struck a line judge in the leg, injuring him.

The punishment: Immediate disqualification from the final, ceding all ranking points and prize money (around £36,000) earned during the week, an £8,000 fine and a police investigation over an alleged 'assault'.

Serena Williams

The year: 2009

The crime: Telling a line judge who foot-faulted her in the US Open semi-final that: "If I could, I would take this ******* ball and shove it down your ******* throat."

The punishment: The umpire docked Serena a point — which, given she was serving at match point down to opponent Kim Clijsters, cost her the match.

Tim Henman

The year: 1995

The crime: Having mishit a volley during a men's doubles match, an angry Henman smashed the ball away - and inadvertently straight into the path of a ball girl.

The punishment: Henman, along with innocent partner Jeremy Bates, were the first players in the Open era to be disqualified in Wimbledon history, though eventually Henman would be remembered for better reasons.

John McEnroe

The year: 1981

The crime: Ranting at umpire Ted James during his first-round match at Wimbledon: "You can't be serious, man. YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS! That ball was on the line! Chalk flew up! It was clearly in! You guys are the absolute pits of the world…"

The punishment: A $1,500 fine — but not, crucially, a disqualification from Wimbledon. Despite losing his temper, McEnroe recovered himself and went on to win not only the match but the whole tournament.

Goran Ivanisevic

The year: 2000

The crime: Frustrated by his performance at a tournament in Brighton, the Croat smashed one racquet and then another in anger. When he smashed his third, he ran out of racquets to continue the second-round match against Hyung-Taik Lee.

The punishment: With no racquets left, Ivanisevic was forced to concede the match due to "lack of appropriate equipment".

Jeff Tarango

The year: 1995

The crime: Having dubbed umpire Bruno Rebeuh "one of the most corrupt officials in the game" during his third-round Wimbledon match against Alexander Mronz, he received a second code violation and walked off court. His wife then slapped the umpire in the face for good measure.

The punishment: Tarango was banned for two years and fined $63,000 but that was eventually reduced to just a ban for the 1996 Wimbledon event.

Martina Hingis

The year: 1999

The crime: Crossing over to French Open final opponent Steffi Graf's side of the court to point out a ball mark, then refusing to keep on playing.

The punishment: The umpire docked Hingis a penalty point, but in itself that was a small penalty with Hingis a set and 2-0 up in the match. The crowd had a bigger say, however, chanting for 'Steffi!' and contributing to Hingis wilting and suffering defeat in three sets.

Marcos Baghdatis

The year: 2012

The crime: Smashing racquets is nothing new in men's tennis — smashing 4 in a 25-second fit of rage at the Australian Open is.

The punishment: An $800 fine, out of the maximum $2,000 possible for racquet abuse.

The ladies of the WTA Tour (according to Laura Robson)

The year: 2010

The crime: Robson told Vogue magazine in an interview: "Some of the tennis girls, they're sluts. They go with every guy and make such a bad name for themselves - and you don't want to be known for stuff like that. You want to be more discreet."

The punishment: None — though the WTA requested a transcript of the interview to establish whether Robson had, as she claimed, had her comments taken out of context.

Mikhail Youzhny

The year: 2008

The crime: Hitting himself in the head — hard — with his racquet three times after drilling a ball into the net during a match in Miami against Nicolas Almagro.

The punishment: The blood streaming from Youzhny's head was punishment enough. He had a medical timeout, came back on court and won the match.