Oval Talk

Can WC2015 recreate London 2012 buzz?

In the midst of the Olympic euphoria that London and Great Britain are enjoying at present, it's hard to focus on anything other than the Games.

But organisers of the 2015 Rugby World Cup — to be held in England — will certainly be taking notes.

Plenty can be learned from the positives and negatives of how the Games were organised, both in the preamble and during the event itself. It will be interesting to see how the legacy of the Olympics unfolds in the UK.

Of course the organisers of RWC2015 will already have their preparations well underway, and have done for some time. But the national feeling generated by the Olympics and the manner in which the interest of the wider public has been captured will be an acutely monitored aspect, as that will prove key to ensuring that off the pitch the World Cup is a resounding success.

Logistically the organisation of the event is relatively straightforward to tackle. Of course it is far from easy, but as a known quantity in terms of its size and locations it is the much more digestible aspect of the planning that will take place.

The action on track during the Olympics has not disappointed, and neither will the rugby in 2015, but it is away from the venues that the hard work can really be benefited from.

One of the great successes of the Olympics has sprung from one of its most hotly debated 'problems'. The difficulty experienced by many in obtaining tickets has been partially counterbalanced by the provision of the big screens across the UK, where fans have been able to congregate and enjoy watching the action live while at the same time partaking in the atmosphere generated by the spectacle.

A similar system with added entertainment such as festivals throughout the course of the 2015 World Cup would not only help to foster that community spirit seen during the Olympics, but would surely attract even greater interest to rugby in general.

As not just a sporting spectacle for diehard rugby fans but also a way of continuing and building on the sporting sentiment which the Olympics has helped to develop further, RWC2015 has the potential to emulate what we are currently experiencing in the UK; immense pride and a togetherness that many will have thought was a very long way off this time last year.

As a sport which prides itself on its ability to draw fans from many different factions together in their common love for the game, rugby can help to do that on a much wider scale in 2015 in England by taking that well-known characteristic of its own and combining it with the kind of uplifting sense of achievement which is proliferating during the Olympics.

After what has been witnessed this summer, confidence will be high.